June 05, 2014

12 Comments

Sewing Techniques ›




 


Two Basic Casings

Today I wanted to show you two easy ways to make casings (which is just a fancy sewing word for a tunnel in the fabric!)

1. Edge Casings

When you just need to run some elastic around the edge of a piece, what do you do? Why, make an edge casing, of course! In this example, I'm making a super-quick doll skirt; I have the bottom edge hemmed, but haven't sewn the edge casing for the elastic yet. Here's how:

Press under the raw edges of your fabric twice -- in this case, 1/4" and then 3/8", to leave enough room for a 1/4" piece of elastic -- and then pin it down.

 

Stitch close to the fold, and voila! your casing! Thread elastic through, stitch down both ends, and you're in business. If you want to get fancy, you can mark your fold lines before pressing them under (like I did in the first picture) -- that's best for days when you want to be really precise.

 

 

2. Applied Casing

This is as simple as the name sounds -- it's a casing which you apply to the fabric. You can use pre-made bias tape, to make the job really easy; I just cut a strip of self fabric and pressed the raw edges under. Either way works great. :)

Simply pin your casing down on the fabric in the desired location, and edgestitch to finish. Be sure there is enough room between your stitch lines for your elastic or ribbon.

Now, would you like to add an opening in your casing? Say you are putting a casing around the waist of a dress, and need a spot for the ribbon to emerge so you can tie it? No problem!

Just cut the casing at the right length, tuck under the raw ends, and pin two folded ends next to each other so that they just touch. Sew normally; then, use the new opening you just made to thread your ribbon through.

 

Thanks for following along today! How do you use casings? Let us know in the comments below :)

For team Pixie Faire,

Melinda

 

 


12 Comments

Melinda
Melinda

August 04, 2014

Hey All! So, the tool I have is just like this one: http://www.joann.com/dritz-loop-turner/1048347.html#prefn1=isProject&start=89&sz=54&prefv1=false
It’s called a “loop turner” — super descriptive name right? :)

I still do use safety pins sometimes, it just depends on the project whether the safety pin or the loop turner (or a traditional bodkin) is faster.

Gail, love your tip about sewing an extra line of stitching just below the fold. Thanks for sharing!

Margie
Margie

July 15, 2014

I love your fashions and appreciate your tips. Thanks for sharing. I plan to get a bodkin too. Never even heard about one until yesterday!

Gail
Gail

June 11, 2014

I like to sew an extra line of stitches about an 8th inch from the top fold of my casing (waistband) I did this with my children’s clothing and do it for my doll clothes too,
it seems to make the gathers neater and also keeps the elastic from being right next to the skin

Gail
Gail

June 11, 2014

I like to sew an extra line of stitches about an 8th inch from the top fold of my casing (waistband) I did this with my children’s clothing and do it for my doll clothes too,
it seems to make the gathers neater and also keeps the elastic from being right next to the skin

Betty
Betty

June 10, 2014

After reading your great tutorial regarding the casings and the comments wanting to know what tool you used to thread the ribbon through; it dawned on me that I already had one!! I hadn’t used it in years but relied on the safety pins. Wow! I can’t believe I had forgotten about it. Thanks!! LOL

Winter
Winter

June 06, 2014

I believe the tool used to thread the ribbon is a flexible bodkin.

Kathy Corley
Kathy Corley

June 06, 2014

I also love the lessons. I like to French my seams and that makes the seam bulky. Any suggestions? I also want to know the name of the tool. It looks like a cake tester that is curved at the end? Thanks.

Margaret
Margaret

June 06, 2014

Love these tutorials. I have that tool and really like it. I’ve never tried the 2nd casing but will soon for a white wedding bag.

Sue
Sue

June 06, 2014

thank you for the clear illustrations, my daughter and grandaughters are learning to sew and your tutorials are so helpful.

Linda
Linda

June 06, 2014

Thanks so much for the great tutorial. Very helpful to know how to work with small pieces.

Linda
Linda

June 06, 2014

simple, too easy, thank you.

Jean T.
Jean T.

June 06, 2014

Thanks, Melinda-nice, clear info!
What is the tool wirh the round loop on the end which you use to thread your ribbon? I always “make-do” using a safety pin but I should probably upgrade to that tool.

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